Sloan-C 2010 Online Workshop Series

Sloan-C workshops are the smart way to support continuous professional development. Each workshop is developed by practitioners for practitioners; enabling thousands of colleagues worldwide to collaborate cost effectively with peers and experts, via real-time and asynchronous meetings. These workshops are 2 to 4 weeks long, and have been widely acclaimed among professional development organizations in online education. To register: http://www.sloanconsortium.org/workshops/upcoming

If you have questions about which workshops may best suit your needs, please contact workshop@sloanconsortium.org for assistance.

 

* Subject to change

AUGUST Dates Facilitator Description
Delivering Content, Fostering Student Interactivity, and
Assessing Learning
in Blended Courses
8/2 - 8/23 Alan Aycock, Tanya Joosten, Gerald Bergtrom,
Amy Mangrich, Matt Russell

University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
Effective blended teaching requires significant rethinking and design. When designed effectively, blended courses can improve learning and offer more effective use of available resources. Additionally, the blended modality provides for less passive learning and more active learning.

Objectives:
  • Use a design protocol to choose appropriate types of content delivery
  • Review alternative models of blended course redesign with special reference to large enrollment courses
  • Advance student interactivity by organizing a small group assignment which integrates face-to-face and online learning
  • Be introduced to methods of assessment consistent with special features of blended learning, and develop a course assessment plan
Providing Effective Feedback in Online Courses for Enabling Student Learning 8/4 - 8/13 David Mohr
Boston University School of Public Health
This workshop will focus on the role that feedback plays in student learning and assessment in online education.

Objectives:
  • Understand the role that feedback plays in the learning process
  • Understand different types of feedback
  • Review strategies to improve current feedback procedures
  • Review feedback strategies tailored to the type of assessment
Podcasting in Higher Education: Current Trends and Applications 8/11 - 8/20 Burks Oakley
Ray Schroeder
University of Illinois at Springfield
Podcasting has had a revolutionary impact on formal and informal teaching and learning. Rising out of the advent of the Apple iPod, podcasts have grown into the mainstream of online media since early 2004. The power of the individual to use podcasts to communicate globally has important implications for educators.

Objectives:
  • Understand the impact of podcasting on teaching and learning
  • Explore how podcasting appeals to students and colleagues
  • Learn how to incorporate podcasting into teaching
Student PTSD and Faculty Stress in the Online Classroom 8/11 - 8/20 Phil McNair
American Public University System
TIn this workshop participants will gain a working understanding of the definition of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), its causes, and possible symptoms victims may manifest in the online classroom. Discussion will focus on resources and tips for faculty to help them deal with students who exhibit PTSD symptoms. In addition, participants will be exposed to the concept of Online Educator Burnout (OEB), a condition related to stress and burnout in online teaching. Workshop facilitators, including a licensed clinical therapist, will help participants understand the causes of OEB and ways educators can mitigate the symptoms to become more effective in their personal and professional lives.

Objectives:
  • Explain the definition, causes, and basic symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Identify resources and techniques that may be useful in their classrooms to deal with students who manifest PTSD symptoms
  • Define Online Educator Burnout (OEB), its causes and symptoms
  • Identify strategies to help mitigate the effect of OEB
Using Community of Inquiry (CoI) Survey for Multi-Level Institutional Evaluation 8/25 - 9/3 Phil Ice
American Public University System
The Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework developed by Garrison, Anderson and Archer (2000) provides a theoretical model of online learning processes that has been used by many scholars and practitioners in the field of online education. CoI is a constructivist process model, assuming effective online learning requires the development of community.

Objectives:
  • Develop an understanding of the three presences (teaching, social and cognitive) that interact to create the online learning experience
  • Learn how to interpret student satisfaction data obtained from administering the Community of Inquiry Framework survey
  • Learn how to use the Community of Inquiry Framework in the course development process, with an emphasis on the development of activities that foster the development of social learning
  • Engage in discussions related to assessing course effectiveness in terms of teaching, social and cognitive presence
  • Understand how Community of Inquiry Framework survey data can be used to asses the introduction of new technologies into courses
Getting Started: First Step Toward Online Teaching (open
workshop & pre-requisite for the Online Teaching Certificate)
8/25 - 9/10 Sharon Taylor
Colorado Community College System
Getting Started: The First Step Toward Online Teaching is a prerequisite to the Sloan-C Certificate program. This workshop introduces potential faculty and/or administrators to online education fundamentals. You will not only discuss the concepts but use the technologies to gain practical "hands-on" experience.

Objectives:
  • Compare face to face and online teaching, including expectations, role adjustments, and course design
  • Apply the principles of effective participation through chat and discussion
  • Use synchronous and asynchronous technologies
  • Prepare for managing online classes, workload and resources
SEPTEMBER Dates Facilitator Description
Online Teaching Certificate Foundation Course
9/8 - 11/12
(Note: 9 weeks)
Julia Parra
New Mexico State University
The Sloan-C Certificate prepares faculty to teach and improve online courses using the Sloan-C pillars of quality in online education--learning effectiveness, scale, faculty and student satisfaction, and access.  Each candidate studies with a mentor and a small cohort of peers during the foundation course, a nine-week sequence of activities that include:
  • Using technologies for building your individual online teaching portfolio
  • Consulting with your mentor to develop a learning plan that matches your context and portfolio goal
  • Developing your course and receiving incremental feedback on it from peers and mentors
  • Applying quality metrics
  • Preparing to use new insights from elective workshops, peers and mentor
Accommodating Students with Disabilities: Leveraging the Online Learning Environment
9/8 - 9/17 Jane Jarrow
Disability Compliance in Career and Online Learning (DCCOL)
Traditional institutions of higher education that have made significant commitments to newly-constituted online programs need to understand how existing disability services unit can absorb the need for serving online students with disabilities. They need to know the legal mandates that obligate them to provide support to online students with disabilities and to understand how to fulfill the obligation to serve this often ignored population.

Objectives:
  • Develop an understanding of accommodations for ensuring complete access and full participation in the educational process
  • Become sensitive to non-visible or hidden disabilities
  • Follow effective teaching practices that will benefit all students
  • Develop alternative activities that achieve the same learning outcomes for all
  • Leverage technological alternatives to help disabled students

Staying Organized, Evaluating Course Design, and Moving Forward w/
Your Blended
Course

This is third workshop in the three-part Blended Learning series.

9/13 - 10/4 Alan Aycock, Tanya Joosten, Gerald Bergtrom,
Amy Mangrich,
Matt Russell

University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
Effective blended course design should remain simple, keeping course goals in mind. Faculty should integrate the various course components, develop templates and rubrics. Contingency plans should also be developed.

Objectives:
  • Identify strategies to help students, to stay organized themselves, and to manage workload
  • Use a comprehensive blended learning checklist to evaluate course redesign process before, during, and after the initial course offering
  • Use the blended learning checklist to produce a course redesign plan to guide them during the remainder of the process
  • Produce a draft syllabus for critique and further development
Advanced Podcasting and other Web 2.0 Multimedia 9/15 - 9/24 Burks Oakley
Ray Schroeder

University of Illinois at Springfield
This unique workshop experience reveals practical tips to making podcasting and other Web 2.0 multimedia (such as screencasting, slidecasting, and streaming video) a dominant force in the online or blended classroom. The facilitators walk through approaches to integrating audio and video and establish pedagogical linkages. Content is tightly focused on engaging the online learner and the workshop is designed to be interactive in nature. This workshop advances the skills of partiipants who have completed the Podcasting in Higher Education: Current Trends & Applications workshop.   Completion of that workshop OR equivalent skills in podcasting are required to register for this workshop.  

Objectives:
  • Engage in a range of podcasting approaches
  • Create other Web 2.0 multimedia (screencasts, slidecasts, YouTube video, etc.)
  • Learn about pedagogical linkages for Web 2.0 multimedia
  • Understand how audio and video can impact learning and engagement
Copyright
Compliance for
Online Educators
9/15 - 9/24 Linda Enghagen
University of Massachusetts - Amherst  
Online educators need to understand personal liability for copyright infringement when using materials to supplement an online course. Copyright owners have sued and will continue to sue individuals. You also need to know how your original works can be protected. Publishers and the academic community have established a set of educational fair use guidelines to provide standards and protection for educators.

Objectives:
  • Learn six rules for course design
  • Be familiar with fair use guidelines for public domain resources
  • Be able to share and protect original work that is published online
Building Web-based Social Networks: Simple, Fast and Scalable (Practical Advice for Business, Education and Other Disciplines) 9/19 - 12/12 John R. Bourne
Executive Director, The Sloan Consortium, Professor of Technology Entrepreneurship, Emeritus, Babson College, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Emeritus, Franklin W. College of Engineering
A new Sloan-C mini-course on Building Web-based Social Networks (commencing Sept 19), this workshop provides a clear understanding of how to create and scale online social networking sites in simple and logical ways. Starting with creation methods, learning the tools, and acquiring the ability to implement real solutions (Drupal Gardens, Drupal Commons, virtual worlds) this workshop will give you a clear sense of how to create social networking sites for your educational venue. At the end of this mini-course you will have implemented your own social networking course for education. The mini-course will share guest lectures with an MBA course at Babson College, to which you will be invited to attend on alternate Sunday evenings (enrichment lectures).

Objectives:
  • Introduce Drupal - an open source approach to social networking - and review history of social media and networking
  • For participants to create their own social media and networking sites; mostly hands-on building of your own site and discussion with others
  • Measurement - Google analytics and related topics
  • Learning about and extending Drupal for your own purposes
  • Implement theory and practice of collaboration paradigms
  • Understanding, testing and integrating virtual world approaches to social networking and presence

**Pre-requisites: A bit of a proclivity toward the techno-geekish side – comfortable with the web, probably simple editing in HTML and the like. No coding necessary in computer languages or scripts.

 
Web Accessibility for Online Learning: A How-To Guide for Creating Accessible Content 9/22 - 10/1

Hadi Rangin University of IllinoisNorm Coombs Equal Access to Software & InformationMarc Thompson
University of Illinois

Universal design seeks to make online learning available and accessible for all types of learners. Online faculty and instructional designers often find themselves overwhelmed or too busy with their day-to-day responsibilities to fully appreciate and integrate the design principles and tools that can be used to make learning equitable, flexible, and adaptable.

 In this hands-on workshop you will discover how principles of Universal Design can help you create course content that can be accessed and used by anyone, including people with disabilities. By the end of this workshop, participants will have a good understanding of Universal Design Principles for Online Learning, potential accessibility/usability issues that need to be considered in course design, and how to create more accessible/usable course content. As the workshop focus will be on web accessibility, familiarity with an HTML authoring tool is desired but not required.

 

Objectives: 

  • Develop an understanding of Universal Design Principles for Online Learning.
  • Understand how people with disabilities access the web and other formats.
  • Develop an understanding of potential accessibility/usability issues that need to be considered in course design and instruction.
  • Create more accessible/usable HTML-based course content. 

Avoiding Faculty Burnout

9/22 - 10/1

Shari McCurdy-Smith
University of Illinois at Springfield
Kathleen Ives
The Sloan Consortium

As more institutions are offering ongoing degree programs online, faculty burnout increasingly is a concern for faculty, administrators, and instructional designers. Online faculty tend to spend more time preparing and teaching their courses as compared to onground faculty. For faculty, this translates into more grading, a 24/7 access mentality, excessive amounts of computer time, as well as more people pulling and grabbing for faculty time and attention. This workshop will explore the issue of academic management in online learning and ways to ensure that faculty can incorporate online teaching into normal academic life. In addition to learning skills to avoid burnout that derives from multiple sources, participants will be encouraged to share their own institutional practices as part of the conversation.

Objectives:

  • Identify strategies for better time management for online teaching
  • Understand exemplary techniques for administrating large online student groups
  • Learn what teaching practices are working for online professors at other institutions

Great Web 2.0 Tools
to Improve Learning

9/22 - 10/1

Bethany Bovard
New Mexico State University

There are many excellent Web 2.0 tools that have been used successfully to enhance learning and increase engagement, but finding just the right tools can be challenging. You will be introduced to five exemplar tools. You will learn how to effectively use these tools.

Objectives:

  • Explore several classes of Web 2.0 technologies
  • Understand how to enhance interactions in distance courses with Web 2.0 tools
  • Learn how to use Web 2.0 tools effectively to improve engagement and learning outcomes

Blended Learning: HyFlex Course Design

9/29 - 10/8

Brian Beatty
San Francisco State University

Hyflex represents an approach to creating and managing blended courses that provides students even greater choices when trying to manage their time. Hyflex, (Hybrid/Flexible), allows a student to choose whether they will attend a face-to-face class, or complete the required work online for any particular class date. Hybrid – combines both online and face-to-face teaching and learning activities. Flexible – students may choose whether or not to attend face-to-face sessions … with no “learning deficit”.

Objectives:

  • Structure and deliver in a Hyflex environment
  • Present the course effectively (and professionally)
  • Engage learners with generative learning activities
  • Use authentic assessment to evaluate student learning

OCTOBER

Dates

Facilitator

Description

 

 

 

 

Using the Quality Matters Rubric to Improve Your Online Course

10/6 - 10/22

Ron Legon, Jean Runyon
Quality Matters

Recognizing quality is much like recognizing art; everybody sees something different. With regard to online courses, your students, faculty, administrators, peers, and accrediting bodies may not know what to look for in assessing quality. Defining quality standards proves crucial to successful course design and implementation.

Objectives:

  • Identify strategies to improve course(s)
  • Learn how to use the rubric tool developed by the nationally recognized, FIPSE-funded Quality Matters (QM) project
  • Affirm strong areas in course(s) and generate specific ideas for improvements

Conference Networking with Social Media

10/6 - 10/29

Bethany Bovard
New Mexico State University / Sloan Consortium

Our highly interconnected, socially networked world provides us with excellent opportunities to stay informed about conference happenings. It doesn't matter if you're attending a conference physically or virtually: social media can enhance your conference experience. Even if you aren't attending the conference at all, you can still stay informed about what is happening at the conference by using the same tools as your conference-attending colleagues.

In this online workshop, we will help you learn about and practice with social networking technologies so you can stay informed and benefit from all the conference activity!

Objectives:

  • Identify features of various social media tools that will help you make conference connections

OR

  • Successfully connect with Sloan Consortium in one of their social networking sites.

Retention Strategies
in Online Education

10/6 - 10/15

Marie Fetzner
Monroe Community College
Ruth Bennett
Western Carolina University

The topic of retention continues to gain interest across the fields of higher education. Online student retention rates can be significantly lower than on-campus equivalents. With record numbers of students studying online, it is imperative that academic institutions discover why online learners have a significantly lower rate of persistence than on-campus students and understand how to improve success rates.

Objectives:

  • Learn strategies for making retention an institution wide priority
  • Become versed in instructional design strategies for learning effectiveness and engagement
  • Identify support systems that enhance student satisfaction and faculty satisfaction
  • From the perspectives of the Sloan-C Pillars, learn how institutions and individuals create cultures for student success

Preparing Faculty for Blended Teaching
and Learning

10/13 - 10/22

Alan Aycock, Tanya Joosten, Gerald Bergtrom,
Amy Mangrich, Matt Russell

University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Faculty developers and trainers prove integral in helping faculty redesign courses for blended teaching and learning. A well established and highly successful blended teaching and learning faculty development program is presented from the viewpoint of these faculty developers and trainers. Guidance regarding program structure, content, and activities as well as general tips and pointers for fostering a successful faculty development experience are highlighted.

Objectives:

  • Understand what is at stake in implementing faculty development programs for blended teaching
  • Observe a well established and highly successful blended teaching and learning faculty development program from the viewpoint of its faculty developers and trainers
  • Address challenges related to instituting a blended course faculty development program
  • Evaluate the steps to take in implementing these programs in your own contexts

Getting Started: First Step Toward Online Teaching (open workshop & pre-requisite for the Online Teaching Certificate)

10/13 - 10/29

Sharon Taylor 
Colorado Community College System      

Getting Started: The First Step Toward Online Teaching is a prerequisite to the Sloan-C Certificate program. This workshop introduces potential faculty and/or administrators to online education fundamentals. You will not only discuss the concepts but use the technologies to gain practical "hands-on" experience.

Objectives:

  • Compare face to face and online teaching, including expectations, role adjustments, and course design
  • Apply the principles of effective participation through chat and discussion
  • Use synchronous and asynchronous technologies
  • Prepare for managing online classes, workload and resources

Beginning Second Life

10/20 - 10/29

Bethany Bovard
New Mexico State University 
  

Second Life is an extremely popular 3D virtual environment that has many applications for education, from increasing social interactions to deepening learning. In this workshop, you'll learn some of the basic Second Life skills that will help you successfully enjoy your second life. You'll also get a brief introduction to some of the educational possibilities of Second Life.

Objectives:

  • Acquire basic Second Life skills
  • Learn where to locate great Second Life resources
  • Explore educational possibilities of Second Life

MERLOT101: An Introduction to MERLOT

10/20 - 10/29

Cathy Swift
MERLOT
  

MERLOT (Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching) is a free and open online community of resources designed primarily for faculty, staff and students of higher education from around the world to share their learning materials and pedagogy. MERLOT, in partnership with the Sloan Consortium, presents this workshop to demonstrate some of the many tools and services that MERLOT has to offer. Participants will learn to easily navigate MERLOT pages, and to participate as MERLOT Members. Workshop assignments will allow participants to tailor their work to their own disciplines and courses they are currently teaching. Some of the key MERLOT tools will be demonstrated, so participants can create “play lists” for materials that can be used for both face-to-face classes and online classes.

Objectives:

  • Familiarize yourself with the MERLOT homepage
  • Become a MERLOT Member and build a Member Profile
  • Understand how to Search and Browse MERLOT
  • Be able to make Member Comments
  • Know how to Contribute a Learning Material to MERLOT
  • Build and share a Personal Collection

Teaching & Learning with Online Labs across Science Disciplines: Making a Case for Greater Acceptance

10/20 - 10/29

Sharon Brewer
Bruno Cinel

Thompson Rivers University

This 2010 workshop builds on the previous Sloan-C MLO workshops which focused on the implementation of online laboratories as well as presenting successful case studies. We have seen that virtual, remote, and blended online laboratory learning experiences have been successfully incorporated into a variety of educational programs. However, the challenge remains in achieving wide acceptance of these modes of delivery as a valid learning experience. This year’s workshop will focus on clearly defining laboratory student learning outcomes and measuring student success. We will also discuss the importance of dissemination as a vital step towards greater acceptance of online laboratories as a promising educational tool in the sciences.  

Objectives:

  • Explore the use of remote instrumentation and virtual labs in an online learning environment.
  • Learn about best practices in online science education including defining learning objectives, assessing student learning and evaluating the instructional effectiveness.
  • Discuss the importance of the scholarship of teaching and learning to validate this educational tool in current science education.

NOVEMBER

Dates

Facilitator

Description

Getting Started:
First Step Toward Online Teaching
(open workshop & pre-requisite for the Online Teaching Certificate)

11/3 - 11/19

Sharon Taylor 
Colorado Community College System

Getting Started: The First Step Toward Online Teaching is a prerequisite to the Sloan-C Certificate program. This workshop introduces potential faculty and/or administrators to online education fundamentals. You will not only discuss the concepts but use the technologies to gain practical "hands-on" experience.

Objectives:

  • Compare face to face and online teaching, including expectations, role adjustments, and course design
  • Apply the principles of effective participation through chat and discussion
  • Use synchronous and asynchronous technologies
  • Prepare for managing online classes, workload and resources

Fair Use and the Teach Act: A Closer Look

11/3 - 11/12

Linda Enghagen
University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

For those who already possess a basic understanding of copyright law, this workshop offers a closer look at the fair use defense and The TEACH Act. The workshop offers insight into how courts really evaluate the fair use factors when confronted with actual cases. In addition, the 9th Circuit's recent decision in Perfect 10 v. Amazon.com, Google.com et al will be discussed.

Objectives:

  • Review recent research on fair use decisions
  • Approach fair use analysis with the goal of advancing creativity
  • Learn about the implementation and impact of the TEACH Act

Intermediate Second Life

11/10 - 11/19

Mike DeMers 
New Mexico State University

This workshop will introduce intermediate users of Second Life to various teaching tools useful to educators. This workshop is for the practitioner who is interested in developing skills to support pedagogy.

Objectives:

  • Understand how Second Life is being used for educational purposes
  • Visit exemplar Second Life educator sites
  • Learn about effective teaching practices in Second Life
  • Learn some introductory Second Life skills for teaching and managing classes

Workload Management Strategies for Online Educators

11/10 - 11/19

Shari McCurdy-Smith
University of Illinois at Springfield
Kathleen Ives
The Sloan Consortium

Online teaching can redefine faculty members' teaching schedules. While the advantages for participating in online education include flexibility; the reality of the 24/7 classroom can prove daunting due to the investment in curriculum development and planning as well as the need to be responsive to student inquiries. This workshop offers strategies enabling online educators to manage time demands while teaching online courses.

Objectives:

  • Learn teaching strategies to improve effectiveness
  • Learn how to prioritize administrative tasks
  • Develop an appropriate combination of delivery models: direct, indirect, and collaborative

Using Moodle to Create Online Courses

11/10 - 11/19

Deborah Antoine
University of Illinois at Springfield
Kathleen Ives
The Sloan Consortium
Jonathan Small
The Sloan Consortium

Moodle is an open source web-based learning management system and a low cost alternative for educators to create vibrant online content.  The development of the Moodle platform was guided by a social constructionist framework of education which assumes that the knowledge a student receives is produced by the groups to which he or she belongs, or by particular discourse agreements. Moodle tools have an emphasis on:  group work, collaboration, communication, sharing, activities, and critical reflection.

Objectives:

  • Develop a working knowledge of Moodle as a learning management system
  • Learn specific Moodle features (user profile, navigation, browsers and settings, participants, discussion forums, Internal mail, assignment drop box, grades, groups, chat, wiki, blog)
  • Create course content using Moodle
  • Become prepared to create a full course site

Video & Audio Tools for Teaching & Learning

11/10 – 11/19

Bethany Bovard
New Mexico State University

Video and audio are powerful media for teaching and learning and can become irreplaceable assets to any distance course. With both video and audio you can present information, communicate with your students, and demonstrate course learning objectives efficiently and effectively.
From threaded voice discussions to podcasting, audio has many applications for your distance course. Audio tools will not only deepen the sense of teacher and student presence in your course, they can also enhance the learning experience. This workshop explores five easy-to-use audio tools that can add some spice and help you build a more robust learning community. You will also have an opportunity to explore and discuss research on educational uses of audio.

Objectives:

  • Explore 5 digital video and digital audio tools
  • Understand how both digital video and audio can enhance communication, teaching, and learning
  • Learn how to use video and audio effectively to improve engagement and learning outcomes
    To FULLY participate in this workshop, you will need a computer with microphone and speakers. We recommend a headset microphone in order to get the most satisfactory experience.

DECEMBER

Dates

Facilitator

Description

Advanced Second Life                

12/1 - 12/10

Cathy Arreguin
San Diego State University     

This workshop advances the skills of intermediate users (who have taken the level 2 workshop or its equivalent) to develop Second Life pedagogy, to design environments, and manage tools.

Objectives:

  • Develop Second Life skills to support pedagogy
  • Become well-versed in: seating areas, display panels, voice/text sessions, session recording, groups (creation, messaging, management), basic building, basic texturing (importing and using graphics), basic interactions (modifying easy scripts for instructional use)

Academic Integrity
in Online Education

12/1 - 12/10

Lori McNabb
University of Texas System TeleCampus
Melissa Olt
Strayer University Online

The role of technology in academic dishonesty is in the news, and federal legislation is pending that will require authentication of online learners. This session will provide information, examples, and a reality check for staff and faculty working in online education.

Objectives:

  • Explore why and how students cheat
  • Review faculty beliefs regarding cheating and online education
  • Review tools and techniques to deter and detect cheating and plagiarism
  • Understand a three-pronged approach to addressing academic integrity: policing (catching and punishing cheaters), prevention (designing courses and assignments that discourage cheating), and virtue (creating learning communities in which students do not want to cheat).