Survey Reports

Grade Change - Tracking Online Education in the United State - 2013

The eleventh annual report on the state of online learning in U.S. higher education is designed, administered and analyzed by the Babson Survey Research Group, with data collection conducted in partnership with the College Board.  Using responses from more than 2,800 colleges and universities, this study is aimed at answering fundamental questions about the nature and extent of online education.

The 2013 survey reveals the number of higher education students taking at least one online course has now surpassed 7.1 million. The 6.1 percent growth rate, although the lowest for a decade, still represents over 400,000 additional students taking at least one online course. Download the report here.

 



Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States, 2012

The tenth annual survey, a collaborative effort between the Babson Survey Research Group and the College Board, is the leading barometer of online learning in the United States.  Based on responses from over 2,800 academic leaders, the complete survey report, "Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States" can be downloaded hereRead the press release



Going the Distance - Online Education in the United States, 2011

The ninth annual survey, a collaborative effort between the Babson Survey Research Group and the College Board, is the leading barometer of online learning in the United States. Based on responses from over 2,500 academic leaders, the complete survey report, "Going the Distance: Online Education in the United States, 2011". This survey reveals that the number of students taking at least one online course has now surpassed 6 million. Now nearly one-third of all students in higher education are taking at least one online course.
The complete report "Going the Distance: Online Education in the United States, 2011" is available here.

 

Class Connections: High School Reform and the Role of Online Learning - 2010

Using data collected from a national sample of principals this study examines the role of online and blended instruction in addressing concerns and issues facing the American high school. From its findings, it is obvious that there are certain initiatives involving online learning that directly address school reform issues such as improving graduation rates, credit recovery, building connections for students to their future college careers, differentiating instruction, and operating costs. Download full report



Class Differences: Online Education in the United States, 2010

The eighth annual Sloan Survey of Online Learning reveals that online enrollment grew by nearly one million students over a year earlier. The survey, a collaborative effort between the Babson Survey Research Group, the College Board and the Sloan Consortium, is the leading barometer of online learning in the United States. Using results from more than 2,500 colleges and universities nationwide, the report finds approximately 5.6 million students were enrolled in at least one online course in fall 2009. The complete report, “Class Differences: Online Education in the United States, 2010” is available here.




Learning on Demand: Online Education in the United States, 2009

The seventh annual Sloan Survey of Online Learning reveals that online enrollment rose by nearly 17 percent from a year earlier. The survey, a collaborative effort between the Babson Survey Research Group, the College Board and the Sloan Consortium, is the leading barometer of online learning in the United States. Using results from more than 2,500 colleges and universities nationwide, the report finds approximately 4.6 million students were enrolled in at least one online course in fall 2008.
The complete report, “Learning on Demand: Online Education in the United States, 2009” is available here.





Strong Faculty Engagement in Online Learning APLU Reports

Unprecedented Study Offers Institutions Guidance for Continued Growth of Online Learning
More than one-third of public university faculty have taught an online course while more than one-half have recommended an online course to students, according to an unprecedented study of administrative and faculty views toward online learning released today by the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities-Sloan National Commission on Online Learning.

Staying The Courses- Online Education in the United States, 2008


Staying The Course - Online Education in the United States, 2008

The 2008 Sloan Survey of Online Learning reveals that enrollment rose by more than twelve percent from a year earlier. The survey of more than 2,500 colleges and universities nationwide finds approximately 3.94 million students were enrolled in at least one online course in fall 2007. The sixth annual survey, a collaborative effort between the Babson Survey Research Group, the College Board and the Sloan Consortium, is the leading barometer of online learning in the United States.

k-12 online 2008 follow up


K–12 Online Learning: A 2008 FOLLOW-UP OF THE SURVEY OF U.S. SCHOOL DISTRICT ADMINISTRATORS

In 2007, the Sloan Consortium issued a report on the extent and nature of online learning in K-12 schools. Entitled, K-12 Online Learning: A Survey of U.S. School District Administrators, this report was welcomed by professional organizations and the popular media interested in the use of online technology for instruction in the public schools. It was based on a national survey of school district administrators during the 2005-2006 academic year. It was one of the first studies to collect data on and compare fully online and blended learning (part online and part traditional face-to-face instruction) in K-12 schools. The purpose of this current study is to replicate the original study in order to substantiate its findings and to examine what if any changes occurred in online learning in K-12 school districts. The current study was conducted two years later and was based on a national survey of school district administrators during the 2007-2008 academic year.

Online Nation: Five Years of Growth in Online Learning Online Nation: Five Years of Growth in Online Learning

Online Nation: Five Years of Growth in Online Learning represents the fifth annual report on the state of online learning in U.S. higher education. This year’s study, like those for the previous four years, is aimed at answering some of the fundamental questions about the nature and extent of online education. Supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and based on responses from more than 2,500 colleges and universities, the study addresses the following key questions:

  • How Many Students are Learning Online?
  • Where has the Growth in Online Learning Occurred?
  • Why do Institutions Provide Online Offerings?
  • What are the Prospects for Future Online Enrollment Growth?
  • What are the Barriers to Widespread Adoption of Online Education?
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Making the Grade: Online Education in the United States, 2006

Making the Grade: Online Education in the United States, 2006 is based on data collected for the fourth annual national report on the state of online education in U.S. higher education. Supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and conducted by the Babson Survey Research Group in partnership with the College Board, the report, based on responses from over 2,200 colleges and universities, examines the nature and extent of online learning among U.S. higher education institutions.

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Making the Grade: Online Education in the United States, 2006 - Midwestern Edition

Making the Grade: Online Education in the United States, 2006 - Midwestern Edition is based on data collected for the fourth annual national report on the state of online education in U.S. higher education. Supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and conducted by the Babson Survey Research Group in partnership with the College Board, the report, based on responses from over 2,200 colleges and universities, examines the nature and extent of online learning among U.S. higher education institutions.

Making the Grade Southern Cover

Making the Grade: Online Education in the United States, 2006 - Southern Edition

Making the Grade: Online Education in the United States, 2006 - Southern Edition is based on data collected for the fourth annual national report on the state of online education in U.S. higher education. Supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and conducted by the Babson Survey Research Group in partnership with the College Board, the report, based on responses from over 2,200 colleges and universities, examines the nature and extent of online learning among U.S. higher education institutions. 

Making the Grade Cover

Blending In: The Extent and Promise of Blended Education in the United States

Blending In: The Extent and Promise of Blended Education in the United States is aimed at answering some of the fundamental questions about the nature and extent of education in the United States. Unlike the previous reports that focused exclusively on online learning, the current report examines blended (also called hybrid) instruction. The findings are based on three years of responses from a national sample of over 1,000 colleges and universities. Additional results are presented from an Eduventures-conducted national survey of 2,033 U.S. adults interested in postsecondary education in the next three years. 

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K–12 Online Learning: A Survey of U.S. School District Administrators

K–12 Online Learning: A Survey of U.S. School District Administrators explores the nature of online learning in K–12 schools and establishes base data for more extensive future studies. This study was based on a national survey of American school district chief administrators during the 2005-2006 academic year. It is one of the first studies to collect data on and compare fully online and blended learning (part online and part traditional face-to-face instruction) in K-12 schools. The distinction between fully online and blended learning is a most important refinement of previous studies on this topic. 

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Growing by Degrees: Online Education in the United States, 2005

Growing by Degrees: Online Education in the United States, 2005 represents the third annual report on the state of online education in U.S. higher education. Supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and based on responses from over 1,000 colleges and universities, this year’s study, like those for previous years’, is aimed at answering some of the fundamental questions about the nature and extent of online education. 

Growing by Degrees Southern Cover

Growing by Degrees: Online Education in the United States, 2005 - Southern Edition

Growing by Degrees: Online Education in the United States, 2005 - Southern Edition is based on data collected for the third annual national report on the state of online education in U.S. higher education. Supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and based on responses from over 400 southern colleges and universities, this special report examines the nature and extent of online learning among the 16 southern states that make up the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB).

The survey analysis is based on a comprehensive nationwide sample of active, degree-granting institutions of higher education in the United States that are open to the public.

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Entering the Mainstream: The Quality and Extent of Online Education in the United States, 2003 and 2004

The 2004 Sloan Survey of Online Learning, Entering the Mainstream: The Quality and Extent of Online Education in the U. S. shows online enrollments continue to grow at rates faster than for the broader student population. Institutes of higher education expect this rate of growth to continue increasing. The second annual survey is based on responses from over 1,100 colleges and universities and represents the state of online education in U.S. higher education. The comprehensive survey by Babson College and Sloan-C concludes that the expected average growth rate for online students for 2004 is 24.8%, up from 19.8% in 2003.

 
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Sizing the Opportunity: The Quality and Extent of Online Education in the United States, 2002 and 2003

The 2003 Sloan Survey of Online Learning polled academic leaders and was weighted to allow for inferences about all degree-granting institutions open to the public. When asked to compare the online learning outcomes with those of face-to-face instruction a majority said they are equal. Two out of every three also responded that online learning is critical to their long-term strategy. Sizing the Opportunity: The Quality and Extent of Online Education in the United States, 2002 and 2003 also looks at characteristics of online learners, student and faculty perceptions as well as how private and public institutions approach online learning. 


 

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As a special offer for readers of our 2013 Survey of Online Learning Report, the Sloan Consortium is offering discounts on our online learning workshops, conferences, and memberships.

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